2019 MW (Master of Wine) examination questions and wines revealed

The Institute of Masters of Wine has published the questions from the 2019 MW examination, including the list of wines for the practical (tasting) part of the examination.

From 3 June to 7 June 160 students sat the theory and practical exams in London, San Francisco and Adelaide. Over four days students had three 12-wine blind practical papers and five theory papers on the subjects of viticulture; vinification and pre-bottling procedures; handling of wines; the business of wine; and contemporary issues.

The practical and theory exams form the second stage of the MW study programme. The first step is the stage 1 assessment, a one-day examination comprising a 12-wine blind tasting exam in the morning and a theory exam in the afternoon. Over 110 students sat the stage 1 assessment in London, San Francisco and Adelaide on 2 and 3 June. Students can only progress to stage 2 of the MW study programme by successfully passing this assessment.

Those who successfully pass the stage 2 theory and practical exams will progress to stage 3, the research paper, the final stage of the MW study programme.

PRACTICAL PAPERS

Paper 1

Question 1

Wines 1-4 are from two different countries. They may be blends or single varieties, but one variety is common to all.

With reference to all four wines:
a) Identify the common grape variety. (20 marks)

For each wine:
b) Identify the origin as closely as possible. (4 x 10 marks)
c) Comment on quality and style with reference to winemaking. (4 x 10 marks)

Question 2

Wines 5-6, 7-8 and 9-10 are paired by country. Each pair is from a different country.

For each wine:

  1. a)  Identify the origin and grape variety(ies) as closely as possible. (6 x 12 marks)
  2. b)  What are the key winemaking techniques used in the wine’s production? (6 x 7

    marks)

  3. c)  Comment on the quality. (6 x 6 marks)

Question 3

Wines 11-12 are from two different Old World countries. With reference to each wine:

1. 2.

3.

a) b)

Comment on the winemaking. (2 x 10 marks)
Discuss the wine’s style, quality and commercial potential. Do not spend time thinking about the wine’s specific origin. (2 x 15 marks)

Sancerre Les Boucauds, Claude Riffault, 2017. Loire, France (13%) Sauvignon Blanc Reserve, Clifford Bay, Villa Maria, 2018. Awatere Valley, Marlborough, New Zealand (13%)
Château La Louvière, 2013. Pessac-Léognan, France (12.5%)

  1. Sauvignon Blanc, The Doctors’, 2017. Marlborough, New Zealand (9.5%)
  2. Rioja Blanco, Allende, 2015. Rioja, Spain (13.5%)
  3. Albarino, Santiago Ruiz, 2017. Rias Baixas, Spain (13%)
  4. Grillo, Isola della Fiamma, 2018. Sicily, Italy (12.5%)
  5. Moscato d’Asti, Elio Perrone, 2017. Piedmont, Italy (5.5%)
  6. Watervale Riesling, Mount Horrocks, 2018. Clare Valley, Australia (12.5%)
  7. M3 Chardonnay, Shaw and Smith, 2016. Adelaide Hills, Australia (13%)
  8. Chinuri, Iago, 2016. Kartli, Georgia (12.5%)
  9. Vecchio Samperi, Marco de Bartoli, NV. Sicily, Italy (16.5%)

Paper 2
Question 1
Wines 1-4 are made from Bordeaux varieties.

For each wine:

  1. a)  Identify the origin and grape variety(ies). (4 x 10 marks)
  2. b)  Comment on the quality in context of the origin, with reference to maturity and the

    potential for development. (4 x 10 marks)

  3. c)  Identify the key winemaking techniques used. (4 x 5 marks)

Question 2

Wines 5-8 come from four different countries in North and South America.

For each wine:

  1. a)  Identify the origin and variety as closely as possible. (4 x 15 marks)
  2. b)  Comment on the quality and the likely market position. (4 x 10 marks)

Question 3
Wines 9-12 come from Europe, but not from France, Italy or Spain. For each wine:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

a) b)

c)

Comment on the quality and commercial potential. (4 x 10 marks)
Assess the current state of maturity and the potential for development. (4 x 8 marks)
Comment on the possible origin and grape variety(ies). (4 x 7 marks)

Château de la Grenière, 2012. Lussac-Saint-Emilion, France (13.5%)
Vigna d’Alceo, Castello dei Rampolla, 2012. Tuscany, Italy (13.5%) Saumur-Champigny, Le Prince, Domaine de Rocheville, 2014. Loire, France (13%)‘V’, Vergelegen, 2012. Stellenbosch, South Africa (14.5%)
Santa Maria Pinot Noir, Au Bon Climat, 2016. Santa Maria, California, USA (13.5%)

  1. Malbec, Pulenta Estate, 2016. Mendoza, Argentina (14%)
  2. Carmenère, Montes Alpha, Viña Montes, 2016. Colchagua, Chile (14.5%)
  3. Single Vineyard Tannat, Bodega Garzón, 2017. Maldonado, Uruguay (14.5%)
  4. Pinot Noir, Maximin Grünhaus, 2015. Mosel, Germany (13.5%)
  5. Blaufränkisch, Weingut Heinrich, 2015. Leithaberg, Austria (13%)
  6. Douro, Quinta da Leda, 2015. Douro, Portugal (13.5%)
  7. Villányi Franc, Vylyan Winery, 2015. Villány, Hungary (13.5%)

Paper 3 Question 1

Wines 1-2 are both from the same region.

For both wines:

  1. a)  Identify the region. (10 marks)
  2. b)  Compare and contrast the method of production. (15 marks)
  3. c)  Compare and contrast the style, quality and commercial appeal of the two wines.

    (25 marks)

Question 2

Wines 3-4 are both from the same region.

For both wines:

  1. a)  Identify the region. (10 marks)
  2. b)  Compare and contrast the style and quality of the two wines. (30 marks)
  3. c)  Discuss the commercial appeal of the two wines. (10 marks).

Question 3

Wines 5-8 are from four different countries (two Old World and two New World), and are made from four different predominant varieties.

For each wine:

  1. a)  Identify the origin as closely as possible. (4 x 6 marks)
  2. b)  Comment on the method of production. (4 x 7 marks)
  3. c)  Comment on the style, quality, and commercial positioning. (4 x 12 marks)

Question 4

Wines 9-10 come from two different countries.

For each wine:

  1. a)  Comment on the method of production. (2 x 8 marks)
  2. b)  Identify the origin as closely as possible. (2 x 8 marks)

c) Comment on the style, quality, and commercial positioning. (2 x 9 marks)

Question 5

Wines 11-12 come from two different countries.

For both wines:
a) Compare and contrast the method of production. (14 marks)

For each wine:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

b) c) d) e)

Identify the origin as closely as possible. (2 x 7 marks) Comment on quality and maturity. (2 x 7 marks) State the level of residual sugar (g/l). (2 x 2 marks) State the level of alcohol (%). (2 x 2 marks)

Grand Brut, Perrier Jouët, NV. Champagne, France (12%)
Brut Grand Cru Millésime, Egly-Ouriet, 2007. Champagne, France (12.5%)
Prosecco Superiore, Giustino B, Ruggeri, 2017. Valdobbiadene, Veneto, Italy (11.5%) Prosecco, La Marca, NV. Veneto, Italy (11%)
Rosé, Chateau Miraval, 2018. Côtes de Provence, France (13%)
Rosado, Cune, 2018. Rioja, Spain (13.5%)
Rosé of Pinot Noir, Rodney Strong, 2018. Russian River Valley, Sonoma County, USA (12.5%)
Rosé, Kim Crawford, 2018. New Zealand (13%)
Manzanilla Papirusa, Lustau, NV. Sanlúcar de Barrameda, Spain (15%)
Cuvée Speciale, Domaine de Montbourgeau, 2012. L’Etoile, Jura, France (13%)
Ben Ryé Passito de Pantelleria, Donnafugata, 2016. Sicily, Italy (14.5%)
Muscat, Campbells, NV. Rutherglen, Australia (17%)